ISJ Special Issues

ISJ has a number of Special Issues, typically around one per year. Special Issues are proposed and edited by Guest Editors appointed by the Editor-in-Chief. They focus on one topic or theme and have a number of papers devoted to various aspects of that topic. The Guest Editors usually provide an extended editorial putting the topic and the papers in context. Special Issues have proved to be very successful and popular with ISJ readers and have been highly cited.

See 'Special Issues' in the top menu above for more details about Special Issues.

Editor-in-Chief
Robert Davison, e-mail: isrobert@cityu.edu.hk

ISJ Editorial Office - Jack Patterson
e-mail: isjadmin@wiley.com

Welcome to the Editor's Website for the ISJ

The purpose of this site is to provide information from the Editors to our readers, authors, potential authors, deans, etc. about the Information Systems Journal (ISJ) over and above that provided on the publishers website which also contains ISJ Table of Contents, access to sample papers and full-text access.

Please follow the links of the above menu which provide detailed information and answers to most questions. We hope you find this website useful. Please contact us with any comments you have.

Editor-in-Chief: Robert Davison

ISJ Indicators
This page just provides a brief overview of some key quality indicators for the ISJ. Please see the details in the various menus above, in particular here.

- ISJ is the premier, predominantly qualitative, information systems journal
- ISJ is in the AIS basket of eight top information systems journals
- ISJ has an impact factor of 4.188 (2019 - latest)
- ISJ is 'the' truly international information systems journal
- ISJ was ranked 1st for author experience
- ISJ will respond within 2 weeks indicating if your paper is out of scope or unsuitable


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ISJ impact factor 2022

The 2021 impact factor for ISJ was 7.767, for 2022 it was 6.4. These are some of the highest impact factors of any IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2023) will not be available until around mid June 2024.

 

Reconfiguring digital embeddedness in hybrid work: The case of employee experience management platforms

Abstract

As organisations respond to the increasing preference for hybrid work, employee experience management (EXM) platforms are becoming integral to transforming employees’ experiences in hybrid workplaces. In this article, we theorise that EXM platforms are implanted into the workflow through digital embeddedness, which is appropriated and reconfigured through the interactions between human and digital subsystems in hybrid work. We adopt the lens of digital/human interaction to explore the reciprocal process of how EXM platforms configure and are reconfigured in hybrid work. Based on a case study of Microsoft Viva, an AI-based EXM platform, we propose a conceptual model that identifies two dimensions of digital embeddedness: digital/human embeddedness and digital/workplace embeddedness. The study contributes to a theoretical understanding of digital embeddedness as a dynamic process whilst also showing the reconfiguration of hybrid work practices evidences a joint optimization. The study further contributes insights into how hybrid work, which resulted from the enforced remote work during the COVID-19 pandemic, continues to emerge due to the digital embeddedness of EXM platforms in the flow of hybrid work.

Source

ISJ impact factor 2022

The 2021 impact factor for ISJ was 7.767, for 2022 it was 6.4. These are some of the highest impact factors of any IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2023) will not be available until around mid June 2024.

 

Reconfiguring digital embeddedness in hybrid work: The case of employee experience management platforms

Abstract

As organisations respond to the increasing preference for hybrid work, employee experience management (EXM) platforms are becoming integral to transforming employees’ experiences in hybrid workplaces. In this article, we theorise that EXM platforms are implanted into the workflow through digital embeddedness, which is appropriated and reconfigured through the interactions between human and digital subsystems in hybrid work. We adopt the lens of digital/human interaction to explore the reciprocal process of how EXM platforms configure and are reconfigured in hybrid work. Based on a case study of Microsoft Viva, an AI-based EXM platform, we propose a conceptual model that identifies two dimensions of digital embeddedness: digital/human embeddedness and digital/workplace embeddedness. The study contributes to a theoretical understanding of digital embeddedness as a dynamic process whilst also showing the reconfiguration of hybrid work practices evidences a joint optimization. The study further contributes insights into how hybrid work, which resulted from the enforced remote work during the COVID-19 pandemic, continues to emerge due to the digital embeddedness of EXM platforms in the flow of hybrid work.

Source

Governing digital platform ecosystems for social options

Abstract

To date, there is little insight into how digital platforms might be governed towards the creation of social value. We argue that digital platforms can contribute to the creation of social value by enabling social options. Thus, we are concerned about how digital platform ecosystems may be governed towards the enablement of social options. We report on the results from our longitudinal qualitative case study of a digital platform employed by ministries of health in more than 70 low- and middle-income countries. We trace the formation and subsequent shaping of governance mechanisms employed to enable social options across national borders and domains. We develop a model of platform governance that shows how such mechanisms are shaped over time through resourcing, capacitating and purposing processes. These three processes play distinct yet complementary roles in governing for social options.

Source

Information systems and sustainable development: From conceptual underpinnings to empirical insights

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

Understanding the influence of digital ecosystems on digital transformation: The OCO (orientation, cooperation, orchestration) theory

Abstract

Digital transformation is a complex, multi-level phenomenon that still challenges research and practice. Recent research has highlighted the influence of digital ecosystems on digital transformation, but we lack knowledge about how this relationship unfolds across the organisational and the ecosystem levels. Following a phenomenon-based theorising approach and applying a digital resource-based view, we present the OCO (orientation, cooperation, orchestration) theory of digital transformation. The OCO theory explains the relationship between an organisation’s digital transformation and its integration into a digital ecosystem. We uncover and explain three interdependent mechanisms, that is, orientation, cooperation, and orchestration, that are set in motion by cross-level interactions between the organisational and the ecosystem levels and that centre around digital resources. Our work advances the frontier of multi-level digital transformation research explaining the influence of a digital ecosystem on digital transformation. We conclude through six propositions that the deeper its digital ecosystem integration, the more likely an organisation’s digital transformation is effective. Therewith, we aim at mobilising future digital transformation research to bridge the organisational and the ecosystem levels and provide four future research themes. Our work also encourages practitioners to acknowledge and manage the influence of digital ecosystems on digital transformation.

Source

Artificial intelligence misuse and concern for information privacy: New construct validation and future directions

Abstract

To address various business challenges, organisations are increasingly employing artificial intelligence (AI) to analyse vast amounts of data. One application involves consolidating diverse user data into unified profiles, aggregating consumer behaviours to accurately tailor marketing efforts. Although AI provides more convenience to consumers and more efficient and profitable marketing for organisations, the act of aggregating data into behavioural profiles for use in machine learning algorithms introduces significant privacy implications for users, including unforeseeable personal disclosure, outcomes biased against marginalised population groups and organisations’ inability to fully remove data from AI systems on consumer request. Although these implementations of AI are rapidly altering the way consumers perceive information privacy, researchers have thus far lacked an accurate method for measuring consumers’ privacy concerns related to AI. In this study, we aim to (1) validate a scale for measuring privacy concerns related to AI misuse (PC-AIM) and (2) examine the effects that PC-AIM has on nomologically related constructs under the APCO framework. We provide evidence demonstrating the validity of our newly developed scale. We also find that PC-AIM significantly increases risk beliefs and personal privacy advocacy behaviour, while decreasing trusting beliefs. Trusting beliefs and risk beliefs do not significantly affect behaviour, which differs from prior privacy findings. We further discuss the implications of our work on both research and practice.

Source

Challenges in developing information and communication technology (ICT) use for rural e?governance: An ecology perspective

Abstract

The utilisation of information and communication technology (ICT) has a profound impact on e-governance across countries, albeit, with limited attention to rural areas. The existing literature on this topic either examines the positive effects of ICT use on e-governance at the individual level or from the urban–rural dichotomy perspective. Meanwhile, the majority of studies are conducted within an urban context, but they scarcely focus on identifying the challenges in developing rural e-governance. As such, we contend that an ecology perspective is necessary to identify the specific distinctions of ICT use on e-governance in various rural ecosystems. To this end, we employ various empirical specifications, namely a fixed-effects model and an instrumental variable approach, to provide evidence of distinct influences of ICT use on e-governance. As follows, we adopt a qualitative research approach to gather evidence on the differentiations of ICT use on rural e-governance within diverse ecosystems. Subsequently, we have identified five crucial obstacles encountered by rural ecosystems in Western China while attempting to develop e-governance. Furthermore, we delineate an all-encompassing internal-external strategy to overcome these challenges.

Source

Beyond the office walls: Work design configurations for task performance across on?site, hybrid and remote forms of work

Abstract

Despite alternative work arrangements becoming more prevalent, existing work design approaches are mostly based on research and practice of traditional on-site work. Struggles with capturing employee performance are reported across different off-site, non-traditional forms of work, such as remote and hybrid. This article performs a comprehensive fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis to juxtaposing different configurations of job characteristics across forms of work. Our multi-source study is based on a matched sample of 1215 diverse working personnel (with supervisors, who evaluated employee performance) in Montenegro. Based on the pathways leading to task performance in different forms of work, we develop propositions centered on the key principles of designing traditional and alternative, non-traditional forms of work. While we confirm the importance of enriched work design, several specific characteristics and their accompanying configurations (including compensatory effects) are highlighted with regard to the task performance achieved. These include high levels of task identity for all three forms of work (on-site, hybrid and remote). Work performed in a traditional on-site setting additionally requires greater task variety. Conversely, remote work requires high information processing and social support. The hybrid model calls for the most complicated work design that combines essential elements of both the on-site and remote work paradigms, namely task variety and information processing, and also for enhanced mechanisms for job feedback. Hybrid work is a universal social phenomenon still on the uptake that likely represents the future of work, and since it combines traditional settings with information and communication technologies, we also emphasise the importance of field-bridging future research of information systems and organisational design areas.

Source

Responding to platform owner moves: A 14?year qualitative study of four enterprise software complementors

Abstract

Integrating the competition and the cooperation perspectives on value co-creation in platform ecosystems, this study explores complementor responses to platform owner moves that adversely affect the complementor’s positioning. Our primary focus is to discern dynamic patterns of complementor responses and to understand their role in the process of re-stabilising the complementor’s positioning. To this end, we conducted a 14-year longitudinal study, analysing 21 move-response instances across four platform partnerships. Our findings reveal three distinct complementor response archetypes: insist, pivot, and detach. Over time, complementors combine these archetypes into three unique response patterns. Through progressive diverging, complementors sidestep platform owner moves by diversifying their offer beyond the focal ecosystem. Although this can entail substantial multi-homing costs, it reduces dependence on the platform owner and bolsters resilience against future moves. Through adaptive oscillating, complementors use platform owner moves as opportunities to gradually diversify their offer within the focal ecosystem. This stepwise market expansion makes them resilient against future moves, while mitigating costs and efforts related to multi-homing. Through persistent insisting, complementors can re-establish their previous positioning, but at the cost of increased dependence on the platform owner, leaving the complementor vulnerable to future moves. We synthesise these findings in our process model of complementor positioning. Emphasising the importance of complementor responses in fostering resilient software ecosystems, this model bears important implications for research on platform governance and platform-dependent entrepreneurship.

Source

Decolonizing IT governance in international non?governmental organisations: An Ubuntu approach

Abstract

IT has an enormous potential to democratise, equalise and decolonize development aid; however, the right IT governance is needed to actualize this potential. Such governance must align with the general efforts in development work to decolonize and eradicate adverse power imbalances. Power imbalances are at play when donors from the Global North finance and thereby set the development agenda for the Global South without concern for the actual needs. IT use in development aid is an important tool in decolonisation struggles, but corresponding structures also risk cementing problematic power distributions. As such, guidelines are needed on how to set up and decolonize IT governance structures. Using insights from a case study of a large international development aid NGO and building on the African emancipation philosophy Ubuntu, we propose five organising principles for a decolonized IT governance. These organising principles serve as guidelines to set up decolonized and emancipating IT governance structures and extend current IT governance theories.

Source

Fit, scope and the shifting baseline: Is your submission likely to be desk rejected?

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source