ISJ Special Issues

ISJ has a number of Special Issues, typically around one per year. Special Issues are proposed and edited by Guest Editors appointed by the Editor-in-Chief. They focus on one topic or theme and have a number of papers devoted to various aspects of that topic. The Guest Editors usually provide an extended editorial putting the topic and the papers in context. Special Issues have proved to be very successful and popular with ISJ readers and have been highly cited.

See 'Special Issues' in the top menu above for more details about Special Issues.

Editor-in-Chief
Robert Davison, e-mail: isrobert@cityu.edu.hk

ISJ Editorial Office - Jack Patterson
e-mail: isjadmin@wiley.com

Welcome to the Editor's Website for the ISJ

The purpose of this site is to provide information from the Editors to our readers, authors, potential authors, deans, etc. about the Information Systems Journal (ISJ) over and above that provided on the publishers website which also contains ISJ Table of Contents, access to sample papers and full-text access.

Please follow the links of the above menu which provide detailed information and answers to most questions. We hope you find this website useful. Please contact us with any comments you have.

Editor-in-Chief: Robert Davison

ISJ Indicators
This page just provides a brief overview of some key quality indicators for the ISJ. Please see the details in the various menus above, in particular here.

- ISJ is the premier, predominantly qualitative, information systems journal
- ISJ is in the AIS basket of eight top information systems journals
- ISJ has an impact factor of 4.188 (2019 - latest)
- ISJ is 'the' truly international information systems journal
- ISJ was ranked 1st for author experience
- ISJ will respond within 2 weeks indicating if your paper is out of scope or unsuitable


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ISJ impact factor 2019

The 2019 impact factor (announced end of June 2020) for ISJ is 4.188. This is the third best impact factor in the Basket of Eight IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2020) will not be available until around mid June 2021.

 

Love cannot buy you money: Resource exchange on reward?based crowdfunding platforms

Abstract

Reward?based crowdfunding platforms – in which campaigns exchange rewards for financial backing to develop a product or service – are one of the fastest?growing segments of the crowdfunding industry. We use an extension of social exchange theory (SET) called the resource theory of social exchange (RTSE) to examine resource exchanges through rewards on Kickstarter. A resource exchange occurs when a project backer and project creator exchange money (ie, financial backing) for a reward (eg, a thank you or a t?shirt). A project creator can develop a reward portfolio that contains various types of resources, which in the RTSE are categorised as love, status, information, money, goods and services. Our study provides a comprehensive examination of resource exchange on a major reward?based crowd funding platform, answering the call to investigate the effects of a key element of such platforms – rewards. We find that the types of resources project creators include in the reward portfolios they offer should be carefully considered. Specifically, our results indicate it is more beneficial to offer rewards that contain universal and concrete resources (eg, goods, services) than resources that are particularistic and symbolic (eg, love, status). However, the positive effect of offering universal and concrete resources as rewards is diminished as the fundraising goal is increased, which suggests that the optimal design of the reward portfolio is contingent on other characteristics of the campaign. Moreover, our findings reveal that while it is advantageous to offer more rewards, it is disadvantageous to offer too many different types of resources across those rewards. Overall, our study adds depth to the understanding of resource exchange in reward?based crowdfunding and provides practical insight into how to design reward portfolios.

Source

ISJ impact factor 2019

The 2019 impact factor (announced end of June 2020) for ISJ is 4.188. This is the third best impact factor in the Basket of Eight IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2020) will not be available until around mid June 2021.

 

Love cannot buy you money: Resource exchange on reward?based crowdfunding platforms

Abstract

Reward?based crowdfunding platforms – in which campaigns exchange rewards for financial backing to develop a product or service – are one of the fastest?growing segments of the crowdfunding industry. We use an extension of social exchange theory (SET) called the resource theory of social exchange (RTSE) to examine resource exchanges through rewards on Kickstarter. A resource exchange occurs when a project backer and project creator exchange money (ie, financial backing) for a reward (eg, a thank you or a t?shirt). A project creator can develop a reward portfolio that contains various types of resources, which in the RTSE are categorised as love, status, information, money, goods and services. Our study provides a comprehensive examination of resource exchange on a major reward?based crowd funding platform, answering the call to investigate the effects of a key element of such platforms – rewards. We find that the types of resources project creators include in the reward portfolios they offer should be carefully considered. Specifically, our results indicate it is more beneficial to offer rewards that contain universal and concrete resources (eg, goods, services) than resources that are particularistic and symbolic (eg, love, status). However, the positive effect of offering universal and concrete resources as rewards is diminished as the fundraising goal is increased, which suggests that the optimal design of the reward portfolio is contingent on other characteristics of the campaign. Moreover, our findings reveal that while it is advantageous to offer more rewards, it is disadvantageous to offer too many different types of resources across those rewards. Overall, our study adds depth to the understanding of resource exchange in reward?based crowdfunding and provides practical insight into how to design reward portfolios.

Source

Power relations inscribed in the enactment of systems development methods

Abstract

Issues of power are often neglected in information systems (IS) studies and under?theorised in IS research. Systems development methods (SDMs) are commonly used in the IT industry to coordinate the activities between developers and clients. The role of power in the relationship between clients and systems developers remains an important topic of research in information systems development (ISD). Yet, despite the importance of understanding this relationship better, there has only been a limited number of studies exploring the role that an SDM can play in influencing this relationship. What is not widely acknowledged or researched is how different forms of power are inscribed in and enacted through an SDM. The aim of this paper is to advance our understanding of different forms of power—here, obtrusive and unobtrusive power—to show how ISD concepts provide structures during the enactment of an SDM and thereby influence relationships between developers and clients. We present qualitative results from an exploratory case study within an IT division of a large international bank and interpret the results using Clegg’s (1989) circuits of power (CoP). Our analysis shows that developers feel disempowered in relation to the client, with developers playing a cooperative but submissive role. Prior SDM enactment studies have either not encountered or not recognised cases where obtrusive and unobtrusive forms of power inscribed within the SDM directly determine the relationship between developers and the client. Our results are presented as a set of propositions explaining how obtrusive and unobtrusive power is inscribed in the SDM and the effect such inscription has on the enactment of the SDM.

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A possible conceptualization of the information systems (IS) artifact: A general systems theory perspective1

Abstract

This opinion paper addresses and contributes to the discourse on whether there is a central artifact that captures the essence of the information systems (IS) discipline. It argues that the IS discipline can, and should be, faithfully captured by an IS artifact. We offer a theoretical conception of the IS artifact by drawing upon General Systems Theory (GST). Key concepts of GST are distilled as meta?principles which inform our formulation of the IS artifact. We use the meta?principles of the IS artifact to develop salient assertions that theorize what an ‘IS’ is. To demonstrate the appropriateness of our conception, we illustrate how the assertions we developed are consistent with patterns related to emerging topics in IS research, notably, healthcare and IT, and Fintech. We formulate a research agenda on these emerging topics—based upon the conceptions developed in the paper—to guide future research. We conclude with the contributions and implications of our study, including the relevance for IT?enabled work in the era of the COVID?19 pandemic.

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Eyes wide open: The role of situational information security awareness for security?related behaviour

Abstract

Most contemporary studies on information security focus on largely static phenomena in examining security?related behaviours. We take a more dynamic, situational and interactionist approach that proposes that security?related behaviours result from an interaction between the person and the perception of a threatening situation. We derive and define situational information security awareness based on situation awareness literature, and examine how individual?level (innate traits, experience) and system?level factors (design variations, warning signal) influence awareness, and how it influences subsequent threat and coping appraisals, and ultimately security?related behaviours in a multi?method phishing experiment including eye tracking and survey components with 107 employees. The results underscore the importance of situational information security awareness and show that past experience with phishing and a security warning increase awareness, while phishing emails’ contextual relevance and misplaced salience decrease awareness. Situational information security awareness, in turn, increases perceived threat and perceived coping efficacy and, ultimately, actual behavioural responses to phishing attacks.

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When enough is enough: Investigating the antecedents and consequences of information security fatigue

Abstract

Despite concerns raised by practitioners, the potential downside of the information security demands imposed by organizations on their employees has received limited scholarly attention. Our research focuses on information security fatigue (hereafter security fatigue), which is defined as a socio?emotional state experienced by an individual who is tired of and disillusioned with security policies and their associated guidelines and procedures. This research delves into the security fatigue concept, investigates its antecedents and reports how fatigue affects employee security policy compliance (and non?compliance). Since security fatigue is not well articulated in the literature and there is limited understanding of its antecedents and consequences, we take a research approach that affords novel insight into this phenomenon. Specifically, we conduct 38 in?depth interviews with business and IT professionals, and then use a qualitative approach to construct a model, including seven research propositions, to highlight the key aspects of security fatigue. Our results indicate that four distinct antecedents contribute to security fatigue, which result in three unique consequences. We discuss security fatigue in relation to past theoretical views and related concepts within the security policy compliance literature and identify directions for future research.

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The need for compelling problematisation in research: The prevalence of the gap?spotting approach and its limitations

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

Generative mechanisms of workarounds, discontinuance and reframing: a study of negative disconfirmation with consumerised IT

Abstract

This study investigates the observed behavioural outcomes when users experience negative disconfirmation with consumerised IT artefacts with the aim to identify the generative mechanisms of these outcomes. We analyse blogposts, authored and published by tablet users, where they narrate their experience with an IT artefact. We employ grounded theory method techniques, and through the lens of Critical Realism and the application of abduction and retroduction, we identify three user accommodating practices following negative disconfirmation, namely discontinuance behaviour, workarounds and reframing, and two generative mechanisms with enduring properties and causal power over them: solution identification and cost/benefits assessment. Our work contributes to the literature of volitional IT use and the consumerisation of IT, by uncovering the mechanisms that pave the way towards observed user behaviours.

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Project leaders as boundary spanners in open source software development: A resource dependence perspective

Abstract

Digital social innovation is important for addressing various social needs, especially from those who are economically disadvantaged. For instance, open source software (OSS) is developed by mass collaboration on digital communities to provide software users free alternatives to commercial products. OSS is particularly valuable to meet the needs of numerous disadvantaged users for whom proprietary software is not affordable. While OSS projects are lack of formal organizational structure, project leaders play a significant role in initiating and managing these projects and eventually, influencing the degree to which the developed software is used and liked by users. Drawing on resource dependence theory, we investigate the impacts of two team?level characteristics of OSS project leaders (ie, size and tenure) on how well the developed software can address users’ needs, with regard to the quantity of software being used by users and the quality of software to users’ satisfaction. Further, from a resource dependence perspective, we examine the moderating role of project leaders’ network ties in shaping the contingency of these effects. By using a large?scale dataset from 43?048 OSS development projects in SourceForge community, we find empirical evidence corroborating our theory. Taken together, our findings suggest the boundary?spanning role of project leaders in developing digital social innovation.

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Digital resilience: How rural communities leapfrogged into sustainable development

Abstract

Digital social innovation (DSI)—the novel use of digital technology to address societal challenges—plays a critical role in our collective pursuit of sustainable development. In this practitioner paper, we present an in?depth DSI case study where the grassroots communities in a remote county leveraged e?commerce to leapfrog out of poverty, becoming successful entrepreneurs with online businesses that thrive on a global scale. Based on this case study, we first discuss three leapfrogging opportunities afforded by e?commerce, which were successfully embraced by the grassroots communities to begin the transformative journey. We then reveal three obstacles that emerged during the technology leapfrogging process, which have challenged the sustainability of the grassroots DSI endeavour. Lastly, we discuss three top?down interventions that have been instrumental in overcoming the bottleneck of grassroots leapfrogging development and subsequently nurture a self?sustaining, resilient community. Overall, by discussing some of the common barriers to the growth and sustainability of DSI, and how they have been addressed, this article offers insights and recommendations for policymakers, public and private sector practitioners, and communities in underdeveloped regions to navigate both the potentials and pitfalls of technology leapfrogging, and ultimately build a pathway towards resilience and sustainability.

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Researching the virtual: A framework for reflexivity in qualitative social media research

Abstract

Recent years have seen an explosion in social media in our everyday lives, and a corresponding increase in social media research in IS. As social media researchers, we are intrigued by the problem of virtuality and context in social media research, and how we might apply reflexive research principles to such settings. In social media, the absence of a setting’s real physical boundaries (to a large extent) limits participants’ ability to create a common experience at the present time and develop a history of shared experiences. As a result, we would contend that many social media researchers’ interpretations of data in social media settings are often black?boxed. In this paper, we argue that many of the challenges concerned with social media settings, by nature, are emergent and linked to their virtual and contextual features. We use the Klein and Myers (1999) framework for traditional interpretive field studies as a vehicle for unpacking these challenges. We contend that these challenges may remain unnoticed if researchers do not actively reflect upon their impact on the research process. In this paper, we present a framework for social media research, considering social media research as a reflexive space, building on the notion of three levels of reflexivity: theory, design and practice. Finally, we discuss some implications of reflexivity for qualitative social media research in IS.

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