ISJ Special Issues

ISJ has a number of Special Issues, typically around one per year. Special Issues are proposed and edited by Guest Editors appointed by the Editor-in-Chief. They focus on one topic or theme and have a number of papers devoted to various aspects of that topic. The Guest Editors usually provide an extended editorial putting the topic and the papers in context. Special Issues have proved to be very successful and popular with ISJ readers and have been highly cited.

See 'Special Issues' in the top menu above for more details about Special Issues.

Editor-in-Chief
Robert Davison, e-mail: isrobert@cityu.edu.hk

ISJ Editorial Office - Jack Patterson
e-mail: isjadmin@wiley.com

Welcome to the Editor's Website for the ISJ

The purpose of this site is to provide information from the Editors to our readers, authors, potential authors, deans, etc. about the Information Systems Journal (ISJ) over and above that provided on the publishers website which also contains ISJ Table of Contents, access to sample papers and full-text access.

Please follow the links of the above menu which provide detailed information and answers to most questions. We hope you find this website useful. Please contact us with any comments you have.

Editor-in-Chief: Robert Davison

ISJ Indicators
This page just provides a brief overview of some key quality indicators for the ISJ. Please see the details in the various menus above, in particular here.

- ISJ is the premier, predominantly qualitative, information systems journal
- ISJ is in the AIS basket of eight top information systems journals
- ISJ has an impact factor of 4.188 (2019 - latest)
- ISJ is 'the' truly international information systems journal
- ISJ was ranked 1st for author experience
- ISJ will respond within 2 weeks indicating if your paper is out of scope or unsuitable


ISJ EarlyView
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ISJ News
Uncategorized

Latest Papers in EarlyView

EarlyView is Wiley’s online repository for papers accepted but not yet published in an issue. The latest EarlyView papers are detailed below. For full details and access to all of the ISJ please go to the publishers website – see Wiley link in Weblinks in the next column.

 

 

Beyond ‘mobility’: A new understanding of moving with technology

Abstract

We report a surprising experience with mobile technology: the lead author found herself seeing and acting differently while running over part of her usual running track with the exercise?tracking application ‘Strava’ on her phone, even without focal attention to the app. We apply the method of problematization to a detailed empirical account of this experience, in conjunction with a literature analysis of taken?for?granted assumptions underpinning research on ‘mobile technology use’. This reveals that, while the relationship of attention, perception, movement and technology was a key element of the surprise, these themes are not well accounted for in current IS literature. In response, we employ William Gibson’s ecological theory of visual perception to reinterpret the empirical account and thereby build a new understanding of the human plus mobile technology that we term moving?with?technology . We introduce to IS: moving?with?technology as a new analytical perspective; the new phenomena of digital sub?species , digital?niches and asynchronous co?location ; and stimulus for new ecologically oriented ‘mobile methods’. Moving?with?technology also has practical implications for urban planners who are using data from digital trace?making tools such as Strava in their decision?making, thereby generating what we call ecological feedback loops .

Source

Latest Papers in EarlyView

EarlyView is Wiley’s online repository for papers accepted but not yet published in an issue. The latest EarlyView papers are detailed below. For full details and access to all of the ISJ please go to the publishers website – see Wiley link in Weblinks in the next column.

 

 

Beyond ‘mobility’: A new understanding of moving with technology

Abstract

We report a surprising experience with mobile technology: the lead author found herself seeing and acting differently while running over part of her usual running track with the exercise?tracking application ‘Strava’ on her phone, even without focal attention to the app. We apply the method of problematization to a detailed empirical account of this experience, in conjunction with a literature analysis of taken?for?granted assumptions underpinning research on ‘mobile technology use’. This reveals that, while the relationship of attention, perception, movement and technology was a key element of the surprise, these themes are not well accounted for in current IS literature. In response, we employ William Gibson’s ecological theory of visual perception to reinterpret the empirical account and thereby build a new understanding of the human plus mobile technology that we term moving?with?technology . We introduce to IS: moving?with?technology as a new analytical perspective; the new phenomena of digital sub?species , digital?niches and asynchronous co?location ; and stimulus for new ecologically oriented ‘mobile methods’. Moving?with?technology also has practical implications for urban planners who are using data from digital trace?making tools such as Strava in their decision?making, thereby generating what we call ecological feedback loops .

Source

Combining social media affordances for organising collective action

Abstract

Social media provide new opportunities for supporting the dynamics of collective action (CA), allowing for the mobilisation of people into debates and involving them in new forms of collective decision making. Although current studies focus on opportunities offered by social media for collective action, there is still a need to deepen the understanding of how social media support the organisation of CA and to study the effects of individual actions performed on social media in complex organisational settings. We here explore how social media are used to manage CA by the Italian political movement Movimento Cinque Stelle, using the concept of affordances as the conceptual framing. Based on the qualitative case analyses, our study contributes to the knowledge base by identifying a typology of nine affordances supporting CA and exploring how the combined actualisations of some affordances of the typology create antecedents of the fundamental processes of CA. On the basis of the study analysis, we suggest a model to describe how social media support CA through affordances, their combinations, and the creation of antecedents and then formulate implications for research and practice.

Source

On tailoring and hand?me?downs

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

ISJ impact factor 2019

The 2019 impact factor (announced end of June 2020) for ISJ is 4.188. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2020) will not be available until around mid June 2021.

Understanding massively multiplayer online role?playing game addiction: A hedonic management perspective

Abstract

Massively multiplayer online role?playing game (MMORPG) addiction presents a serious issue worldwide and has attracted increasing attention from academic and other public communities. This article addresses this critical issue and fills research gaps by proposing and testing a research model of MMORPG addiction. Building on the conceptual foundation of the hedonic management model of addiction and the technology affordance perspective, we develop a research model explaining how MMORPG affordances (ie, achievement, social and immersion affordances) are associated with the duality of hedonic effects (ie, perceived positive mood enhancement and perceived negative mood reduction) and the extent of MMORPG addiction. Using structural equation modelling, we empirically test our research model with 406?MMORPG players. The results show that both perceived positive mood enhancement and perceived negative mood reduction positively correlate with the extent of MMORPG addiction. Furthermore, achievement and immersion affordances are positively associated with the duality of hedonic effects, whereas social affordance is not. Our study contributes to the growing body of technology addiction literature by revealing the relationships between the two hedonic effects and the extent of MMORPG addiction, and by offering a contextualised explanation of the role of MMORPG affordances in these relationships. We offer an alternative perspective on the far?reaching, unintended relationships between technological affordances and addictive technology use. Our study provides game developers and policymakers with insights into preventing MMORPG addiction to create an entertaining, healthy virtual playground.

Source

Constructing continuity across the organisational culture boundary in a highly virtual work environment

Abstract

While remote work allows organisations to offer their employees flexibility and harness global talent and markets for business growth, inability to rely on physical interactions between employees imposes challenges specific to operations in highly virtual work environments. Among these characteristic issues are challenges associated with organisational socialisation and organisational culture. Accordingly, an action design research project was carried out for building a socialisation substitute (an information artefact in the form of a digital organisational culture handbook) to support synthesis of symbolic and pragmatic components of organisational culture at case company Smartly.io, a highly virtual organisation experiencing rapid growth. The paper contributes to the literature on socialisation and organisational culture by demonstrating one approach to designing a surrogate for socialisation that acts as a conduit between the symbolic aspects of organisational culture (such as values) and the pragmatic ones (such as toolkits). The work contributes to organisational discontinuity theory also, via theory?generating descriptive analysis of the process of building continuity across the organisational culture boundary through creation of an information artefact. The resulting artefact was found to deliver practical utility to the case company and encapsulate generalisable design principles for this building process.

Source

The art of referencing

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

Digital transformation of business ecosystems: Evidence from the Korean pop industry

Abstract

The notion of business ecosystems is gaining prominence among academics and practitioners. Scholars advise that business ecosystems are inherently fluid, unbounded and amorphous and thus that their boundaries can shift. Practitioners further suggest that business ecosystems are characterised by inter?network – as opposed to inter?firm – competition, and, moreover, that they are mainly driven by technological advancements. And yet few studies examine the role of information technology (IT) in driving boundary practices that enable the formation and transformation of business ecosystems. Through an in?depth case study of technology?enabled transformations within the Korean pop music (K?pop) industry, our study examines how the digital transformation of business ecosystems unfolded. Our study contributes to the emergent body of knowledge on business ecosystems in a number of ways. Our investigations uncover the conditions under which the constituent firms operate and analyse the role of IT and its implications on new organisational forms. From our analysis, we present a framework that reveals insights on critical boundary practices and formative strategies for digital business ecosystems. We illustrate how these boundary practices drive industry change, from a largely linear content delivery system resembling a value chain to a new value network of co?specialisation and self?organisation among firms in a new digital business ecosystem.

Source

The mediating influence of smartwatch identity on deep use and innovative individual performance

Abstract

Given its personal and ubiquitous nature, the smartwatch can easily become infused into individuals’ daily lives, social roles, and relationships. This type of intertwinement of an information technology (IT) in the daily lives of individuals creates an IT identity. To understand this phenomenon in the personal IT context, this research draws from the IT identity and valence frameworks to examine how benefits and risks of smartwatch use affect deep use and innovative individual performance through smartwatch identity. Specifically, we examine how social interactions and belongingness (i.e., benefits) and privacy risk (i.e., risk) influence the building of the smartwatch identity, and in turn both deep use and innovative individual performance. Further, we explore the mediating influence of smartwatch identity. Using a survey, we collected data from 216 smartwatch users. The analysis provides evidence for the IT identity to deep use link and IT identity to innovative individual performance link. This work contributes to the IT identity literature by examining and showing how both positive and negative aspects of the smartwatch influence identity construction. This work also demonstrates the relationships between IT identity and performance, and deep use and performance. For practice, we offer insights for enhancing identity and performance.

Source

From panopticon to heautopticon: A new form of surveillance introduced by quantified?self practices

Abstract

In this research, we investigate whether quantified?self (QS) technologies, based on wearable technologies, enable individuals’ empowerment or lead to their disempowerment. To understand better the potential paradoxical effects of QS technologies, we adopt a critical approach by mobilising the panopticon metaphor from Foucault’s original writings and more precisely, his four core concepts, namely power, knowledge, body and space. Relying on a qualitative study that consists of the analysis of 12 interviews, 14?142 messages extracted from online forums, and 30 blogs, we explore the discourses associated with the usage of QS technologies. Our findings indicate that self?quantification has ambivalent, conflicting effects—13 empowering and 11 disempowering—spanning the dimensions of power, knowledge, body and space. Our research also shows the emergence of micro?surveillance of oneself, which we name the heautopticon. The implications of this critical research also offer possibilities for change by discussing social and individual emancipation.

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