ISJ Special Issues

ISJ has a number of Special Issues, typically around one per year. Special Issues are proposed and edited by Guest Editors appointed by the Editor-in-Chief. They focus on one topic or theme and have a number of papers devoted to various aspects of that topic. The Guest Editors usually provide an extended editorial putting the topic and the papers in context. Special Issues have proved to be very successful and popular with ISJ readers and have been highly cited.

See 'Special Issues' in the top menu above for more details about Special Issues.

Editor-in-Chief
Robert Davison, e-mail: isrobert@cityu.edu.hk

ISJ Editorial Office - Jack Patterson
e-mail: isjadmin@wiley.com

Welcome to the Editor's Website for the ISJ

The purpose of this site is to provide information from the Editors to our readers, authors, potential authors, deans, etc. about the Information Systems Journal (ISJ) over and above that provided on the publishers website which also contains ISJ Table of Contents, access to sample papers and full-text access.

Please follow the links of the above menu which provide detailed information and answers to most questions. We hope you find this website useful. Please contact us with any comments you have.

Editor-in-Chief: Robert Davison

ISJ Indicators
This page just provides a brief overview of some key quality indicators for the ISJ. Please see the details in the various menus above, in particular here.

- ISJ is the premier, predominantly qualitative, information systems journal
- ISJ is in the AIS basket of eight top information systems journals
- ISJ has an impact factor of 4.188 (2019 - latest)
- ISJ is 'the' truly international information systems journal
- ISJ was ranked 1st for author experience
- ISJ will respond within 2 weeks indicating if your paper is out of scope or unsuitable


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ISJ impact factor 2022

The 2021 impact factor for ISJ was 7.767, for 2022 it was 6.4. These are some of the highest impact factors of any IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2023) will not be available until around mid June 2024.

 

Sustainable affordances of information systems for cultural tourism: An organisational aesthetics perspective

Abstract

Although information systems (IS) are increasingly used to provide sustainable solutions for tourism, our understanding of the social mechanisms whereby IS contribute to a sustainable visitor economy is limited. This paper fills the gap by investigating how organisations enact the affordances of IS in preserving intangible cultural heritage (ICH) to contribute to a sustainable visitor economy. Using an organisational aesthetics perspective, we explore the mechanisms through an in-depth case study of an ICH-based company in Jingdezhen, a famous historical porcelain city in China. Through the effective use of IS tools, the case organisation has successfully transformed from a ceramic manufacturing plant to a popular tourist attraction. Our study unveils six sustainable affordances of IS in three dimensions, wherein ICH aesthetics act as direct stimuli, knowledge tools and experiences. Affordances emerge from the processes of both creating and managing aesthetics. By enacting these affordances, the case organisation builds a more profound engagement with online audiences, attracts more ICH visitors and transfers ICH knowledge to potential inheritors of the tradition, creating a sustainable visitor economy. Our findings, summarised into a sustainable affordances model, contribute to the IS for sustainable tourism literature by shedding light on the black box of the social mechanisms of IS-enabled ICH preservation. The sustainable affordances model can also help ICH-based organisations reflect on how to build a sustainable visitor economy using IS.

Source

ISJ impact factor 2022

The 2021 impact factor for ISJ was 7.767, for 2022 it was 6.4. These are some of the highest impact factors of any IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2023) will not be available until around mid June 2024.

 

Sustainable affordances of information systems for cultural tourism: An organisational aesthetics perspective

Abstract

Although information systems (IS) are increasingly used to provide sustainable solutions for tourism, our understanding of the social mechanisms whereby IS contribute to a sustainable visitor economy is limited. This paper fills the gap by investigating how organisations enact the affordances of IS in preserving intangible cultural heritage (ICH) to contribute to a sustainable visitor economy. Using an organisational aesthetics perspective, we explore the mechanisms through an in-depth case study of an ICH-based company in Jingdezhen, a famous historical porcelain city in China. Through the effective use of IS tools, the case organisation has successfully transformed from a ceramic manufacturing plant to a popular tourist attraction. Our study unveils six sustainable affordances of IS in three dimensions, wherein ICH aesthetics act as direct stimuli, knowledge tools and experiences. Affordances emerge from the processes of both creating and managing aesthetics. By enacting these affordances, the case organisation builds a more profound engagement with online audiences, attracts more ICH visitors and transfers ICH knowledge to potential inheritors of the tradition, creating a sustainable visitor economy. Our findings, summarised into a sustainable affordances model, contribute to the IS for sustainable tourism literature by shedding light on the black box of the social mechanisms of IS-enabled ICH preservation. The sustainable affordances model can also help ICH-based organisations reflect on how to build a sustainable visitor economy using IS.

Source

A configurational theory of digital disruption

Abstract

Digital Disruption (DD) has become a hot topic in recent years, yet detailed research is surprisingly lacking. The literature offers almost no insights into how DD occurs at the industry level and what industry factors influence it. This paper advances knowledge of DD by developing and testing a configurational theory. Using a multi-method research design, we identify two types of DD and four industry factors (downstream DD, digitally enabled structural conflict, transferability of core competitive elements, and industry player size) that contingently lead to the different types of DD. We integrate those findings into a configurational theory that describes causal recipes of how these factors or conditions combine to produce the outcome of transformational DD and destructive DD. The theory offers important implications for researchers and practitioners. The research also contributes methodologically by demonstrating the merits of combining grounded theory with qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to expand the theory-building potential of QCA.

Source

Evolving editorial boards

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

How do consumers make behavioural decisions on social commerce platforms? The interaction effect between behaviour visibility and social needs

Abstract

The online phenomenon of social commerce (i.e., s-commerce) platforms has emerged as a combination of online social networking and e-commerce. On s-commerce platforms, consumers can observe others’ behavioural decisions and can distinguish those made by their friends from those made by their followees (i.e., the people a focal consumer follows but who do not follow that consumer back). Given this distinction, our study examines how consumers’ behavioural decisions—regarding, for example, purchases, ratings, or “likes”—are made on s-commerce platforms, with a focus on how they are influenced by prior decisions of friends and followees. Combining panel data from a large s-commerce platform and two controlled experiments, we identify a strong normative social influence pattern in which consumers tend to follow others’ prior decisions to gain social approval. Because the occurrence of normative social influence depends on both consumer behaviours with high public visibility and strong consumer needs to establish social ties, the unique information concerning behaviour visibility and consumers’ social needs in the panel data allows us to identify normative social influence and to distinguish it from informational confounding mechanisms. Our panel data results show that on a friend network, where consumers’ behavioural decisions are visible, females exhibit a greater tendency to follow others’ prior decisions than males. We attribute this result to the stronger social needs of females. However, on a followee network, where behavioural decisions are invisible, these differences become less evident. Moreover, the two experiments demonstrate that making decision contexts private or activating social needs via a priming procedure can thwart (or even turn off) normative social influence. Our findings challenge prior research that identifies informational social influence as the predominant driver of conformity behaviours and thus have important implications for practice related to normative social influence, such as the development of techniques for satisfying consumers’ different social needs depending on their gender or any other situational factors on s-commerce platforms.

Source

A person?centred view of citizen participation in civic crowdfunding platforms: A mixed?methods study of civic backers

Abstract

Crowdfunding platforms have emerged as a promising contemporary means for mobilising collective civic actions to address local or social issues, improve community cohesion and develop the public good. This empirical study taps into the understudied civic crowdfunding platforms (CCP) developed to facilitate such actions, proposing, supporting and funding public-interest projects through crowdsourcing and microfinancing. Previous studies have shown that individuals’ characteristics affect their level of civic engagement with social issues. Considering the diversity of contributor motivations, we aim to shed light on the dynamics of emergent subpopulations of citizens who participate in CCPs. To this end, we use a sequential mixed-methods approach to integrate our fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA) findings with the results of an in-depth qualitative study, to gain rich and robust inferences and meta-inferences. In Study 1 (n?=?316), we used fsQCA to explore five distinctive configural profiles that display the heterogeneity of civic backers’ motivations, including civic champions, prosocial advocates, normative supporters, reward seekers and regret-averse contributors. In Study 2, we corroborated and complemented our fsQCA inferences through an extreme-case study and identified four boundary conditions. Taken together, our inferences and meta-inferences address the heterogeneity of motivations for participating in CCPs, by understanding and theorising about diverse profiles of citizen backers. Finally, we offer practical implications for successful civic crowdfunding initiatives.

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Understanding the careers of freelancers on digital labor platforms: The case of IT work

Abstract

Online freelancing, an alternative form of work where independent workers offer services on digital labor platforms, gains increasing importance in IS research. While the general understanding of this form of work is growing, research lacks understanding careers on digital labor platforms. However, these differ from careers in offline labor markets due to volatility, global matching and platform mediation, the digital and temporary nature of work, and algorithmic management as particular platform working conditions. Therefore, to understand how working conditions on digital labor platforms influence the dynamic career paths of freelancers, we conduct an exploratory analysis using 35 interviews with freelancers and clients on digital labor platforms. We thus contribute to the body of knowledge on alternative forms of work on digital labor platforms by developing a long-term freelancing career model and outlining the dynamics of advancement, decline, and exit within platform careers. We also illustrate mechanisms between career phases in terms of platform lock-in effects, which arise from the career advancement dynamics and career exit dynamics.

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Chatbot interactions: How consumption values and disruptive situations influence customers’ willingness to interact

Abstract

Chatbots offer customers access to personalised services and reduce costs for organisations. While some customers initially resisted interacting with chatbots, the COVID-19 outbreak caused them to reconsider. Motivated by this observation, we explore how disruptive situations, such as the COVID-19 outbreak, stimulate customers’ willingness to interact with chatbots. Drawing on the theory of consumption values, we employed interviews to identify emotional, epistemic, functional, and social values that potentially shape willingness to interact with chatbots. Findings point to six values and suggest that disruptive situations stimulate how the values influence WTI with chatbots. Following theoretical insights that values collectively contribute to behaviour, we set up a scenario-based study and employed a fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis. We show that customers who experience all values are willing to interact with chatbots, and those who experience none are not, irrespective of disruptive situations. We show that disruptive situations stimulate the willingness to interact with chatbots among customers with configurations of values that would otherwise not have been sufficient. We complement the picture of relevant values for technology interaction by highlighting the epistemic value of curiosity as an important driver of willingness to interact with chatbots. In doing so, we offer a configurational perspective that explains how disruptive situations stimulate technology interaction.

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Bridging the gap between work? and nonwork?related knowledge contributions on enterprise social media: The role of the employee–employer relationship

Abstract

Knowledge is an invaluable resource and a key to organisational success. To leverage this resource adequately, organisations must encourage their employees to share what they know with their peers. Enterprise social media (ESM) has emerged as an ideal venue for achieving this goal, and numerous studies have examined the drivers of work-related knowledge contributions on these platforms. The present study contributes to this body of research by examining a prevalent yet underexplored form of knowledge sharing that often occurs on ESM: nonwork-related knowledge contributions. We argue that contrary to a commonly held belief, this presumably hedonic employee behaviour can benefit organisations through its spillover effect on the work domain. In other words, we argue that nonwork-related knowledge contributions on ESM can foster work-related ones. Building on social exchange theory and on the associative–propositional evaluation model in social psychology, we also show that the employee–employer (EE) relationship—conceptualised in terms of perceived organisational support and perceived employee psychological safety—moderates the relationship between the two forms of knowledge contributions. The analysis of field data collected from 269 employees of a French e-commerce company confirmed that nonwork-related knowledge contributions are positively associated with work-related ones and that this positive association is moderated by the EE relationship. We discuss the theoretical contributions of our results and explain key managerial implications for organisations hoping to reap the benefits of ESM in a sustainable way.

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Article production changes at the ISJ and their consequences

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

The ethics of using generative AI for qualitative data analysis

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source