ISJ Special Issues

ISJ has a number of Special Issues, typically around one per year. Special Issues are proposed and edited by Guest Editors appointed by the Editor-in-Chief. They focus on one topic or theme and have a number of papers devoted to various aspects of that topic. The Guest Editors usually provide an extended editorial putting the topic and the papers in context. Special Issues have proved to be very successful and popular with ISJ readers and have been highly cited.

See 'Special Issues' in the top menu above for more details about Special Issues.

Editor-in-Chief
Robert Davison, e-mail: isrobert@cityu.edu.hk

ISJ Editorial Office - Jack Patterson
e-mail: isjadmin@wiley.com

Welcome to the Editor's Website for the ISJ

The purpose of this site is to provide information from the Editors to our readers, authors, potential authors, deans, etc. about the Information Systems Journal (ISJ) over and above that provided on the publishers website which also contains ISJ Table of Contents, access to sample papers and full-text access.

Please follow the links of the above menu which provide detailed information and answers to most questions. We hope you find this website useful. Please contact us with any comments you have.

Editor-in-Chief: Robert Davison

ISJ Indicators
This page just provides a brief overview of some key quality indicators for the ISJ. Please see the details in the various menus above, in particular here.

- ISJ is the premier, predominantly qualitative, information systems journal
- ISJ is in the AIS basket of eight top information systems journals
- ISJ has an impact factor of 4.188 (2019 - latest)
- ISJ is 'the' truly international information systems journal
- ISJ was ranked 1st for author experience
- ISJ will respond within 2 weeks indicating if your paper is out of scope or unsuitable


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ISJ impact factor 2022

The 2021 impact factor for ISJ was 7.767, for 2022 it was 6.4. These are some of the highest impact factors of any IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2023) will not be available until around mid June 2024.

 

ISJ impact factor 2022

The 2021 impact factor for ISJ was 7.767, for 2022 it was 6.4. These are some of the highest impact factors of any IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2023) will not be available until around mid June 2024.

 

Fit, scope and the shifting baseline: Is your submission likely to be desk rejected?

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

Speculative foresight: A foray beyond digital transformation

Abstract

As the discourse regarding digital transformation has developed, we see an opportunity to extend the concept of becoming digital into an as-of-yet unrealized future. By examining the foundational assumptions of digital transformation, we reveal two frontiers that expand the current transformation discourse into futures where their implications and outcomes will reside. A conceptual frontier suggests that we begin to conceptualise the worlds in which future organisations and people observe digital technologies and their enactments as an unexceptional and quite mundane aspect of their daily lives. We initiate conceptualising being digital as an outcome of the transformations our current research studies. A second analytic frontier embraces world-making in current theorizations and the development of future-leaning conceptualization of alternative worlds. Speculative foresight is an approach for staging new concepts and relationships, critiquing current research practice and theory boundaries, and creating novel and generative theorizations. An example speculative foresight scenario illustrates onto-epistemic assumptions and ambiguities in current theories of digital transformation regarding how future ethics will be conceived. The implications and limitations of this approach are discussed in the context of the need for IS research to develop orientations that can contribute to understanding digital transformation processes and both positive and negative transformation outcomes that will constitute yet unrealized futures.

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Mobilising new frontiers in digital transformation research: A problematization review

Abstract

In this paper, we mobilise new frontiers in digital transformation (DT) research by deconstructing the literature’s underlying assumptions and analysing their correspondence with current theory. To do so, we conduct a problematization review across the fields of IS, strategy and entrepreneurship, organisation theory and management studies, to capture the multidimensionality of DT research. Unlike systematic literature reviews commonly found in DT research, a problematization review critically questions how theoretical contributions have been constructed in past research to develop novel theoretical questions. Our findings offer three contributions. First, we uncover five research trajectories, each with its own in-house assumptions about the nature of digital technologies and how organisations, groups and individuals interact with those technologies and the data they generate. Second, we show how individual studies within the identified research trajectories position themselves against prior research, pointing at six distinct processes of constructing theoretical contributions. Finally, we mobilise new frontiers of research by questioning DT research field assumptions that cut across the five research trajectories. We conclude by discussing the theoretical implications of our problematization review for further DT research.

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Linking information technology use with corporate entrepreneurship: The mediation role of openness to external knowledge

Abstract

Firms are increasingly applying multiple information technologies (ITs) to pursue corporate entrepreneurship. However, how different ITs can be leveraged collectively to achieve corporate entrepreneurship remains largely underexplored. Drawing upon the knowledge-based view, we develop an integrative theoretical model to delineate how three types of commonly deployed IT (i.e. organisational enterprise systems use, organisational social media use and top management team social media use) can be used collectively in the knowledge acquisition and utilisation processes to achieve corporate entrepreneurship. Specifically, we posit that organisational IT uses (i.e. organisational enterprise systems use and organisational social media use) enhance openness to external knowledge in the knowledge acquisition process, which in turn serves as the mediation mechanism to channel organisational IT uses into corporate entrepreneurship. Moreover, top management team IT use (i.e. top management team social media use) shapes the effect of openness to external knowledge on corporate entrepreneurship in the knowledge utilisation process. The empirical analysis using multi-respondent survey data from 1252 managers in 313 firms provides strong support for the proposed model. This study contributes to the information systems research on how IT influences corporate entrepreneurship by distinguishing the roles of organisational enterprise systems use, organisational social media use and top management team social media use in enhancing corporate entrepreneurship through firms’ openness to external knowledge.

Source

Digital transformation in Latin America: Challenges and opportunities

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

Assessing digital capabilities for digital transformation—The MIND framework

Abstract

With the rise in the advances and adoption of digital technologies and evolving business dynamics, we live in an era where many organisations are embarking on digital transformation. To stay relevant, however, organisations struggle to comprehensively outline the digital capabilities they have or need in relation to the digital transformation objectives they aim for. This struggle stems from the paucity of knowledge and practical guidance on how to assess the digital capabilities of organisations relative to their desired digital transformation goals. This paper presents a framework (MIND Framework) for assessing digital capabilities in four critical areas – Management (M), Infrastructure (I), Networking/Sourcing (N), and Development (D) – abstracted from prior literature. The framework assesses digital capability status in each area in relation to the organisation’s stated digital transformation goals. MIND, which is an outcome of a multi-year design science research project, helps organisations assess their current capability status and create a pathway for navigating from their current status to the desired transformation state. In this article, we describe an in-depth application of the MIND framework in assessing the digital capabilities of an incumbent company in the digital transformation process. Based on this, we illustrate how the framework can provide valuable insights and attitudinal shifts in an organisation’s digital transformation efforts. We further abstract from the case to demonstrate how the assessment of an organisation’s digital capabilities can provide valuable insights and critical input for any organisation embarking on a digital transformation journey. We conclude with a detailed guideline on how organisations can apply the MIND framework in their transformation journey.

Source

How do unintended consequences emerge from EHR implementation? An affordance perspective

Abstract

Drawing upon an affordance-actualisation perspective, we aim to advance our knowledge of the emergence of unintended consequences from the implementation of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems. Prior research has not yet deeply understood how these unintended consequences unfold. We investigate how the (non-)actualisation of affordances produces unintended consequences. Our exploratory case study of an EHR system implemented in Italy reveals four types of actions (flexing, bypassing, avoiding, and reorganising) through which different types of unintended consequences occur with the (non-)actualisation of affordances. We explain and theorise how interactions among technology features and psychosocial and organisational constraints/enablers contribute to users’ perception of affordances and technological constraints. This, in turn, influences different types of user actions, leading to unintended consequences. Our findings and insights contribute to the literature on unintended consequences and help organisations better manage implementing new systems.

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Examining formation and alleviation of information security fatigue by using job demands–resources theory

Abstract

The implementation and reinforcement of information security policies (ISPs) can lead to information security fatigue (hereafter security fatigue), which can drive employees to engage in unwanted behaviours. Thus, managers must reduce the likelihood of security fatigue. Therefore, in the present study, we employed job demands–resources theory and hypothesized that security-related demands would result in security fatigue. Furthermore, we identified resources that may alleviate such fatigue. The research model was tested with data collected from 386 employees of organisations with ISPs. The findings indicate that job and personal resources can reduce the occurrence of security fatigue and engagement in opportunistic security behaviours by enhancing engagement. In addition, the effect of security fatigue on opportunistic security behaviours can be suppressed through the implementation of behavioural evaluations. Our study contributes to the formulation of methods for relieving security fatigue and ameliorating its negative effects.

Source

Social media?induced polarisation

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

Techno?eustress creators: Conceptualization and empirical validation

Abstract

Technostress is an inevitable part of work life. This paper takes a step toward mastering it by focusing on positive stress that Information Systems (IS) creates for IS users, known as techno-eustress. Factors that create techno-eustress are known as techno-eustress creators, which we conceptualise as cognitions experienced by IS users, that IS positively challenges and motivates them to enhance their work. They are important to study because they represent foundational opportunities for professional achievement and growth emanating from IS use. Drawing from theories of psychological eustress, self-determination and proactive work, this paper theorises and validates an instrument to measure techno-eustress creators. We establish the construct’s validity and examine its nomological relationships based on data collected from working professionals who used IT for their work. We draw on data from two qualitative studies (N?=?35) and three quantitative surveys (N?=?980) conducted at different points in time. We validate techno-eustress creators as a second-order reflective construct having four dimensions: techno-mastery, techno-autonomy, techno-enrichment and techno-relatedness. We examine its nomological relationships with factors that create techno-distress, IT strain, and user satisfaction. We contribute to the literature by theorising and validating four ways in which IS users are challenged and motivated by IS to enhance their work. We inform to managerial practice by drawing attention to how organisations can strengthen the different ways employees experience the creators of the ‘good’ stress that use of IS generates.

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