ISJ Special Issues

ISJ has a number of Special Issues, typically around one per year. Special Issues are proposed and edited by Guest Editors appointed by the Editor-in-Chief. They focus on one topic or theme and have a number of papers devoted to various aspects of that topic. The Guest Editors usually provide an extended editorial putting the topic and the papers in context. Special Issues have proved to be very successful and popular with ISJ readers and have been highly cited.

See 'Special Issues' in the top menu above for more details about Special Issues.

Editor-in-Chief
Robert Davison, e-mail: isrobert@cityu.edu.hk

ISJ Editorial Office - Jack Patterson
e-mail: isjadmin@wiley.com

Welcome to the Editor's Website for the ISJ

The purpose of this site is to provide information from the Editors to our readers, authors, potential authors, deans, etc. about the Information Systems Journal (ISJ) over and above that provided on the publishers website which also contains ISJ Table of Contents, access to sample papers and full-text access.

Please follow the links of the above menu which provide detailed information and answers to most questions. We hope you find this website useful. Please contact us with any comments you have.

Editor-in-Chief: Robert Davison

ISJ Indicators
This page just provides a brief overview of some key quality indicators for the ISJ. Please see the details in the various menus above, in particular here.

- ISJ is the premier, predominantly qualitative, information systems journal
- ISJ is in the AIS basket of eight top information systems journals
- ISJ has an impact factor of 4.188 (2019 - latest)
- ISJ is 'the' truly international information systems journal
- ISJ was ranked 1st for author experience
- ISJ will respond within 2 weeks indicating if your paper is out of scope or unsuitable


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ISJ impact factor 2019

The 2019 impact factor (announced end of June 2020) for ISJ is 4.188. This is the third best impact factor in the Basket of Eight IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2020) will not be available until around mid June 2021.

 

Breaking or keeping the habits: exploring the role of legacy habits in the process of discontinuing organisational information systems

Abstract

Users develop habits in relation to information systems (IS) to reduce the cognitive and behavioural efforts needed for using them. However, when these systems have to be discontinued, users face challenges regarding how to stop relying on their legacy habits. Despite their importance, we know little about how legacy habits shape the way users discontinue a legacy system. Through a comparative case?study approach, in a large mortgage firm and an international telecommunication company, we identify three roles that these habits play during the discontinuance process. We demonstrate that legacy habits not only play an ‘inhibiting’ role by keeping users attached to legacy systems; they also play a ‘bridging’ role by acting as a common ground for users to start working with a new system and a ‘deterring’ role when users resent certain habits of working with the legacy systems, despite their orientation to keep relying on these habits. We contribute to the IS habit literature by extending the roles of legacy habits beyond an inhibiting role. We also enrich the conceptualisation of legacy habits beyond the individual level by showing that the socio?technical conditions in which the habits are embedded impact the emergence and evolution of their roles during the discontinuance process. We discuss the implications of our findings for theorising and managing IS discontinuance process.

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ISJ impact factor 2019

The 2019 impact factor (announced end of June 2020) for ISJ is 4.188. This is the third best impact factor in the Basket of Eight IS Journals. See past ISJ impact factors and the Editor’s comment on impact factors here. The next impact factor (2020) will not be available until around mid June 2021.

 

Breaking or keeping the habits: exploring the role of legacy habits in the process of discontinuing organisational information systems

Abstract

Users develop habits in relation to information systems (IS) to reduce the cognitive and behavioural efforts needed for using them. However, when these systems have to be discontinued, users face challenges regarding how to stop relying on their legacy habits. Despite their importance, we know little about how legacy habits shape the way users discontinue a legacy system. Through a comparative case?study approach, in a large mortgage firm and an international telecommunication company, we identify three roles that these habits play during the discontinuance process. We demonstrate that legacy habits not only play an ‘inhibiting’ role by keeping users attached to legacy systems; they also play a ‘bridging’ role by acting as a common ground for users to start working with a new system and a ‘deterring’ role when users resent certain habits of working with the legacy systems, despite their orientation to keep relying on these habits. We contribute to the IS habit literature by extending the roles of legacy habits beyond an inhibiting role. We also enrich the conceptualisation of legacy habits beyond the individual level by showing that the socio?technical conditions in which the habits are embedded impact the emergence and evolution of their roles during the discontinuance process. We discuss the implications of our findings for theorising and managing IS discontinuance process.

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Black Lives Matter: A perspective from three Black information systems scholars

Abstract

Professional computing organisations, including the ACM, IEEE and INFORMS published statements supporting Black Lives Matter during the 2020 racial unrest in the United States. While the voices of these professional organisations are echoed from positions of power, the concerns of Black IS professors are silenced. In this opinion piece, we centre on the voices of Black professors who seek to thrive in an IS field where they are woefully underrepresented, tokenized, isolated, marginalised and excluded from positions of power. Building on the Black Lives Matter movement’s momentum, we offer critical insights about our lived experiences and examine pertinent issues. These issues include systemic racism in the ivory tower and the performative nature of diversity work in the academy. In direct response to the Help the Association of Information Systems (AIS) Build a System that Provides Equality for All, we offer an inclusive framework for promoting transparency, justification, compliance and enforcement of the AIS’s action plan for widening participation in IS.

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Prosocial rule breaking on health information security at healthcare organisations in South Korea

Abstract

Regulations, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), establish standards to protect patients’ medical records from security breaches. Insiders’ prosocial misbehaviour within healthcare organisations can cause significant damage to relevant stakeholders. Such behaviour without malicious intention needs to be better understood and carefully managed from the perspective of prosocial behaviour. For this study, a research model was developed that includes the factors influencing student nurses’ intention to disclose patient health information. The model was empirically tested with nursing students in South Korea with a scenario?based experiment. We find that both altruistic (impact on others) and egoistic (impact on the self) motivations are significantly important in raising situational empathy. On the other hand, an egoistic motivation (impact on the self) significantly affects people’s perception of their responsibility, which mediates the relationship between situational empathy and prosocial intention to disclose. The implications of our findings are discussed.

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Information technology as a resource to counter domestic sex trafficking in the United States

Abstract

Globally, millions of individuals are victims of sex trafficking and are compelled to perform sexual acts through force, fraud, or coercion. Law enforcement agencies, non?profit organisations, and social entrepreneurs increasingly are using information technology as a resource to locate, identify, and rescue victims and find, arrest, and convict traffickers. In this qualitative case study, we partnered with a non?profit organisation that trains law enforcement officers to use information technology to counter sex trafficking. For this research study, we observed training courses, interviewed law enforcement officers and non?profit staff, and reviewed technology usage logs and other data sources. Some officers readily used the new information technology post?training, while others failed to use the new technology. Using conservation of resources theory as a sensitising lens, we identify two factors affecting the use of new technology post?training: the level of organisational resources available to individuals and the individual’s perceptions of the new information technology as a resource. With these findings, we develop the Resources Model of Information Technology Use to explain how perceptions of organisational and technology resources affect information technology usage patterns and outcomes.

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Making the world a better place with fintech research

Abstract

Financial technology (fintech) is seen as possessing significant potential to provide the poor access to financial services and help them escape the clutches of poverty. Surprisingly, Information Systems (IS) research has engaged little with fintech’s promise of fostering financial inclusion for the poor. In the spirit of ‘making a better world with ICTs’, conducting ‘responsible IS research for a better world’ and ‘understanding and tackling societal grand challenges through management research’, we advance a framework for guiding IS research on fintech?led financial inclusion. Drawing on the IS literature and Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) scholarship, we extrapolate five areas of research that can better illuminate fintech’s contributions to financial inclusion: (a) business strategies for fintech?led financial inclusion; (b) digital artifacts of fintech?led financial inclusion; (c) business environment of fintech?led financial inclusion; (d) microfoundations of fintech for financial inclusion; (e) developmental impacts of fintech. We conclude with a discussion of how the five areas offer opportunities for impactful research on fintech and the promise of building a financially inclusive society.

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A comparison of features in a crowdsourced phishing warning system

Abstract

Initial research on using crowdsourcing as a collaborative method for helping individuals identify phishing messages has shown promising results. However, the vast majority of crowdsourcing research has focussed on crowdsourced system components broadly and understanding individuals’ motivation in contributing to crowdsourced systems. Little research has examined the features of crowdsourced systems that influence whether individuals utilise this information, particularly in the context of warnings for phishing emails. Thus, the present study examined four features related to warnings derived from a mock crowdsourced anti?phishing warning system that 438 participants were provided to aid in their evaluation of a series of email messages: the number of times an email message was reported as being potentially suspicious, the source of the reports, the accuracy rate of the warnings (based on reports) and the disclosure of the accuracy rate. The results showed that crowdsourcing features work together to encourage warning acceptance and reduce anxiety. Accuracy rate demonstrated the most prominent effects on outcomes related to judgement accuracy, adherence to warning recommendations and anxiety with system use. The results are discussed regarding implications for organisations considering the design and implementation of crowdsourced phishing warning systems that facilitate accurate recommendations.

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The associate editor and senior editor roles in premier IS journals

Information Systems Journal, EarlyView. Source

Status differentials and framing in the implementation of IT?enabled task migration strategies

Abstract

In globally distributed environments, gaps exist between an organisational?level decision to migrate IT?enabled tasks and the actual execution of strategy since a high?level consensus does not always specify the precise sequencing and pacing of task migration in detail. This absence of operational?level detailing can trigger status?led enactments of power. Drawing on a qualitative case study of a distributed finance function in a global logistics firm, this paper explores how high?status business units (BU) frame their task migration actions and contrasts it with how a low?status support unit frames and accounts for the actions of high?status BUs. The findings show how high?status BUs frame their own actions as protecting, supporting and monitoring the migrated tasks while the low?status support unit frames the same set of actions as resisting, interfering and hypercriticizing. Theoretically, the paper suggests that during the implementation of task migration strategies, frames deployed by a low?status unit considers its weaker position of power and serves to neutralise conflict with the more powerful, higher?status unit.

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Context?aware user profiles to improve media synchronicity for individuals with severe motor disabilities

Abstract

Losing the ability to communicate inhibits social contact, creates feelings of frustration and isolation and complicates personal comfort and medical care. Progressive diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) can cause severe motor disabilities that make communication through traditional means difficult, slow, and exhausting, even with the support of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Using a design science research approach, we seek to improve the communication process for individuals with severe motor disabilities. We develop a series of design requirements to inform the creation and evaluation of an artefact, an AAC system that incorporates context?aware user profiles to improve the communication process for individuals with severe motor disabilities. We derive prescriptive knowledge through the creation of design principles based on our findings and justify these design principles using the lens of media synchronicity theory (MST). This research identifies opportunities for further research related to MST and provides insights to inform those designing communication systems for individuals that rely on AAC systems.

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Issues, challenges, and a proposed theoretical core of agile software development research

Abstract

Over the last two decades, agile software development (ASD) has garnered much attention in both research and practice. Several ASD methods and techniques have been developed and studied. In particular, researchers have provided several theoretical perspectives on ASD and contributed rich insights to the ASD practice. Still, despite calls for a more unified theoretical understanding of ASD, a theoretical core of ASD has not been identified. This paper offers a theoretical core of ASD research, clarifying what is essential and what is less essential for IS agility, hoping to spark a scholarly discussion, and provides implications of such a core for understanding method tailoring.

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